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  • What is wound drainage?
    The post-operative evacuation or removal of air, fluid and devitalised tissues from the operating site after surgery.
  • What are the most important reasons for wound drainage?
    to drain the exudate or wound fluid to promote the wound flaps to join together to prevent infections
  • What other purposes are there for wound drainage?
    Promotion of a faster wound healing Reduction of haematoma Reduction of possible infections Reduction of scar tissue formation
  • What are the factors for providing wound drainage and why is it essential?
    Haematoma formation - haematomas produce elevation and discoloration of the wound edges, discomfort, and swelling. Patellar dislocation following haematoma - A large hematoma can cause a disruption of the medial retinaculum. This may cause patellar dislocation after primary total knee replacement. Neck haematoma - Neck hematomas following operations on the thyroid, parathyroid, or carotid artery are particularly dangerous, because they may expand rapidly and compromise the airway. Wound infection with small haematoma - Small hematomas may resorb, but they increase the incidence of wound infection. Fullness, pain, bruising and psychological fear of bleeding - Feeling of fullness and pain in the area which is affected. The skin may turn into deep purple blue colour and may have an effect on patients and their psychological fear of bleeding. Leaking - accumulated blood increase pressure and blood sometimes leaks through skin sutures. Compression and lack of oxygen- Proper oxygen or if the tissues in the affected area get compressed. Necrosis - Necrosis which occurs due to the death of the blood cells, wound separation and infection can also be observed. Seroma formation - Seromas often follow operations that involve elevation of skin flaps and transection of numerous lymphatic channels (eg, mastectomy, operations in the groin). Abscess: risk of infection - Seroma formation may develop into an abscess and begin the symptoms of an infection and requires medical treatment for that. Abscess: uncomfortable and cause of sickness - An abscess is unlikely to disappear on its own, it may grow in size and become very uncomfortable, and the associated infection may cause high level of sickness. Detect a bleeder early - When a drain is used, a large bleeder can be detected (if this occurs) early in the recovery room and measures can be taken immediately. Wound healing - Remove accumulative wound fluid, reduce internal pressure, draw wound clefts together, reduce scar tissue.
  • What are the applications for wound drainage and what is the expected volume to be collected post-operatively?
    following surgeries General surgery 50 – 400 ml Orthopedics - total knee replacement 600 – 800 ml Orthopedics - total hip replacement 300 – 600 ml Orthopedics - Spinal surgery 200 – 300 ml Abdominal - Hepatectomy 200 – 400 ml Abdominal - Pancreatectomy 200 – 400 ml Abdominal - Abdominoperineal resect. 200 – 400 ml Breast surgery - Mastectomy 80 – 600 ml Breast surgery - Axillary lymphadenectomy 80 – 600 ml Plastic surgery - Breast reduction 150 – 250 ml Plastic surgery - Face lift (rhytidectomy) 50 – 150 ml Plastic surgery - Hand 50 – 150 ml Gynaecology - Ceasarean section 60 – 400 ml ORL surgery – Parotidectomy 40 – 300 ml ORL surgery - Laryngectomy 40 – 300 ml Urology 100 – 450 ml
  • Why do most surgeons like to suture or tape the wound drain to the patient?
    to prevent that the patient - by accident - pulls the drain out of the wound to ensure that the drain remains “put” into the patient
  • What is wound drainage?
    The post-operative evacuation or removal of air, fluid and devitalised tissues from the operating site after surgery.
  • What are the most important reasons for wound drainage?
    to drain the exudate or wound fluid to promote the wound flaps to join together to prevent infections
  • What other purposes are there for wound drainage?
    Promotion of a faster wound healing Reduction of haematoma Reduction of possible infections Reduction of scar tissue formation
  • What are the factors for providing wound drainage and why is it essential?
    Haematoma formation - haematomas produce elevation and discoloration of the wound edges, discomfort, and swelling. Patellar dislocation following haematoma - A large hematoma can cause a disruption of the medial retinaculum. This may cause patellar dislocation after primary total knee replacement. Neck haematoma - Neck hematomas following operations on the thyroid, parathyroid, or carotid artery are particularly dangerous, because they may expand rapidly and compromise the airway. Wound infection with small haematoma - Small hematomas may resorb, but they increase the incidence of wound infection. Fullness, pain, bruising and psychological fear of bleeding - Feeling of fullness and pain in the area which is affected. The skin may turn into deep purple blue colour and may have an effect on patients and their psychological fear of bleeding. Leaking - accumulated blood increase pressure and blood sometimes leaks through skin sutures. Compression and lack of oxygen- Proper oxygen or if the tissues in the affected area get compressed. Necrosis - Necrosis which occurs due to the death of the blood cells, wound separation and infection can also be observed. Seroma formation - Seromas often follow operations that involve elevation of skin flaps and transection of numerous lymphatic channels (eg, mastectomy, operations in the groin). Abscess: risk of infection - Seroma formation may develop into an abscess and begin the symptoms of an infection and requires medical treatment for that. Abscess: uncomfortable and cause of sickness - An abscess is unlikely to disappear on its own, it may grow in size and become very uncomfortable, and the associated infection may cause high level of sickness. Detect a bleeder early - When a drain is used, a large bleeder can be detected (if this occurs) early in the recovery room and measures can be taken immediately. Wound healing - Remove accumulative wound fluid, reduce internal pressure, draw wound clefts together, reduce scar tissue.
  • What are the applications for wound drainage and what is the expected volume to be collected post-operatively?
    following surgeries General surgery 50 – 400 ml Orthopedics - total knee replacement 600 – 800 ml Orthopedics - total hip replacement 300 – 600 ml Orthopedics - Spinal surgery 200 – 300 ml Abdominal - Hepatectomy 200 – 400 ml Abdominal - Pancreatectomy 200 – 400 ml Abdominal - Abdominoperineal resect. 200 – 400 ml Breast surgery - Mastectomy 80 – 600 ml Breast surgery - Axillary lymphadenectomy 80 – 600 ml Plastic surgery - Breast reduction 150 – 250 ml Plastic surgery - Face lift (rhytidectomy) 50 – 150 ml Plastic surgery - Hand 50 – 150 ml Gynaecology - Ceasarean section 60 – 400 ml ORL surgery – Parotidectomy 40 – 300 ml ORL surgery - Laryngectomy 40 – 300 ml Urology 100 – 450 ml
  • Why do most surgeons like to suture or tape the wound drain to the patient?
    to prevent that the patient - by accident - pulls the drain out of the wound to ensure that the drain remains “put” into the patient
  • What is wound drainage?
    The post-operative evacuation or removal of air, fluid and devitalised tissues from the operating site after surgery.
  • What are the most important reasons for wound drainage?
    to drain the exudate or wound fluid to promote the wound flaps to join together to prevent infections
  • What other purposes are there for wound drainage?
    Promotion of a faster wound healing Reduction of haematoma Reduction of possible infections Reduction of scar tissue formation
  • What are the factors for providing wound drainage and why is it essential?
    Haematoma formation - haematomas produce elevation and discoloration of the wound edges, discomfort, and swelling. Patellar dislocation following haematoma - A large hematoma can cause a disruption of the medial retinaculum. This may cause patellar dislocation after primary total knee replacement. Neck haematoma - Neck hematomas following operations on the thyroid, parathyroid, or carotid artery are particularly dangerous, because they may expand rapidly and compromise the airway. Wound infection with small haematoma - Small hematomas may resorb, but they increase the incidence of wound infection. Fullness, pain, bruising and psychological fear of bleeding - Feeling of fullness and pain in the area which is affected. The skin may turn into deep purple blue colour and may have an effect on patients and their psychological fear of bleeding. Leaking - accumulated blood increase pressure and blood sometimes leaks through skin sutures. Compression and lack of oxygen- Proper oxygen or if the tissues in the affected area get compressed. Necrosis - Necrosis which occurs due to the death of the blood cells, wound separation and infection can also be observed. Seroma formation - Seromas often follow operations that involve elevation of skin flaps and transection of numerous lymphatic channels (eg, mastectomy, operations in the groin). Abscess: risk of infection - Seroma formation may develop into an abscess and begin the symptoms of an infection and requires medical treatment for that. Abscess: uncomfortable and cause of sickness - An abscess is unlikely to disappear on its own, it may grow in size and become very uncomfortable, and the associated infection may cause high level of sickness. Detect a bleeder early - When a drain is used, a large bleeder can be detected (if this occurs) early in the recovery room and measures can be taken immediately. Wound healing - Remove accumulative wound fluid, reduce internal pressure, draw wound clefts together, reduce scar tissue.
  • What are the applications for wound drainage and what is the expected volume to be collected post-operatively?
    following surgeries General surgery 50 – 400 ml Orthopedics - total knee replacement 600 – 800 ml Orthopedics - total hip replacement 300 – 600 ml Orthopedics - Spinal surgery 200 – 300 ml Abdominal - Hepatectomy 200 – 400 ml Abdominal - Pancreatectomy 200 – 400 ml Abdominal - Abdominoperineal resect. 200 – 400 ml Breast surgery - Mastectomy 80 – 600 ml Breast surgery - Axillary lymphadenectomy 80 – 600 ml Plastic surgery - Breast reduction 150 – 250 ml Plastic surgery - Face lift (rhytidectomy) 50 – 150 ml Plastic surgery - Hand 50 – 150 ml Gynaecology - Ceasarean section 60 – 400 ml ORL surgery – Parotidectomy 40 – 300 ml ORL surgery - Laryngectomy 40 – 300 ml Urology 100 – 450 ml
  • Why do most surgeons like to suture or tape the wound drain to the patient?
    to prevent that the patient - by accident - pulls the drain out of the wound to ensure that the drain remains “put” into the patient
  • What is wound drainage?
    The post-operative evacuation or removal of air, fluid and devitalised tissues from the operating site after surgery.
  • What are the most important reasons for wound drainage?
    to drain the exudate or wound fluid to promote the wound flaps to join together to prevent infections
  • What other purposes are there for wound drainage?
    Promotion of a faster wound healing Reduction of haematoma Reduction of possible infections Reduction of scar tissue formation
  • What are the factors for providing wound drainage and why is it essential?
    Haematoma formation - haematomas produce elevation and discoloration of the wound edges, discomfort, and swelling. Patellar dislocation following haematoma - A large hematoma can cause a disruption of the medial retinaculum. This may cause patellar dislocation after primary total knee replacement. Neck haematoma - Neck hematomas following operations on the thyroid, parathyroid, or carotid artery are particularly dangerous, because they may expand rapidly and compromise the airway. Wound infection with small haematoma - Small hematomas may resorb, but they increase the incidence of wound infection. Fullness, pain, bruising and psychological fear of bleeding - Feeling of fullness and pain in the area which is affected. The skin may turn into deep purple blue colour and may have an effect on patients and their psychological fear of bleeding. Leaking - accumulated blood increase pressure and blood sometimes leaks through skin sutures. Compression and lack of oxygen- Proper oxygen or if the tissues in the affected area get compressed. Necrosis - Necrosis which occurs due to the death of the blood cells, wound separation and infection can also be observed. Seroma formation - Seromas often follow operations that involve elevation of skin flaps and transection of numerous lymphatic channels (eg, mastectomy, operations in the groin). Abscess: risk of infection - Seroma formation may develop into an abscess and begin the symptoms of an infection and requires medical treatment for that. Abscess: uncomfortable and cause of sickness - An abscess is unlikely to disappear on its own, it may grow in size and become very uncomfortable, and the associated infection may cause high level of sickness. Detect a bleeder early - When a drain is used, a large bleeder can be detected (if this occurs) early in the recovery room and measures can be taken immediately. Wound healing - Remove accumulative wound fluid, reduce internal pressure, draw wound clefts together, reduce scar tissue.
  • What are the applications for wound drainage and what is the expected volume to be collected post-operatively?
    following surgeries General surgery 50 – 400 ml Orthopedics - total knee replacement 600 – 800 ml Orthopedics - total hip replacement 300 – 600 ml Orthopedics - Spinal surgery 200 – 300 ml Abdominal - Hepatectomy 200 – 400 ml Abdominal - Pancreatectomy 200 – 400 ml Abdominal - Abdominoperineal resect. 200 – 400 ml Breast surgery - Mastectomy 80 – 600 ml Breast surgery - Axillary lymphadenectomy 80 – 600 ml Plastic surgery - Breast reduction 150 – 250 ml Plastic surgery - Face lift (rhytidectomy) 50 – 150 ml Plastic surgery - Hand 50 – 150 ml Gynaecology - Ceasarean section 60 – 400 ml ORL surgery – Parotidectomy 40 – 300 ml ORL surgery - Laryngectomy 40 – 300 ml Urology 100 – 450 ml
  • Why do most surgeons like to suture or tape the wound drain to the patient?
    to prevent that the patient - by accident - pulls the drain out of the wound to ensure that the drain remains “put” into the patient
  • What is wound drainage?
    The post-operative evacuation or removal of air, fluid and devitalised tissues from the operating site after surgery.
  • What are the most important reasons for wound drainage?
    to drain the exudate or wound fluid to promote the wound flaps to join together to prevent infections
  • What other purposes are there for wound drainage?
    Promotion of a faster wound healing Reduction of haematoma Reduction of possible infections Reduction of scar tissue formation
  • What are the factors for providing wound drainage and why is it essential?
    Haematoma formation - haematomas produce elevation and discoloration of the wound edges, discomfort, and swelling. Patellar dislocation following haematoma - A large hematoma can cause a disruption of the medial retinaculum. This may cause patellar dislocation after primary total knee replacement. Neck haematoma - Neck hematomas following operations on the thyroid, parathyroid, or carotid artery are particularly dangerous, because they may expand rapidly and compromise the airway. Wound infection with small haematoma - Small hematomas may resorb, but they increase the incidence of wound infection. Fullness, pain, bruising and psychological fear of bleeding - Feeling of fullness and pain in the area which is affected. The skin may turn into deep purple blue colour and may have an effect on patients and their psychological fear of bleeding. Leaking - accumulated blood increase pressure and blood sometimes leaks through skin sutures. Compression and lack of oxygen- Proper oxygen or if the tissues in the affected area get compressed. Necrosis - Necrosis which occurs due to the death of the blood cells, wound separation and infection can also be observed. Seroma formation - Seromas often follow operations that involve elevation of skin flaps and transection of numerous lymphatic channels (eg, mastectomy, operations in the groin). Abscess: risk of infection - Seroma formation may develop into an abscess and begin the symptoms of an infection and requires medical treatment for that. Abscess: uncomfortable and cause of sickness - An abscess is unlikely to disappear on its own, it may grow in size and become very uncomfortable, and the associated infection may cause high level of sickness. Detect a bleeder early - When a drain is used, a large bleeder can be detected (if this occurs) early in the recovery room and measures can be taken immediately. Wound healing - Remove accumulative wound fluid, reduce internal pressure, draw wound clefts together, reduce scar tissue.
  • What are the applications for wound drainage and what is the expected volume to be collected post-operatively?
    following surgeries General surgery 50 – 400 ml Orthopedics - total knee replacement 600 – 800 ml Orthopedics - total hip replacement 300 – 600 ml Orthopedics - Spinal surgery 200 – 300 ml Abdominal - Hepatectomy 200 – 400 ml Abdominal - Pancreatectomy 200 – 400 ml Abdominal - Abdominoperineal resect. 200 – 400 ml Breast surgery - Mastectomy 80 – 600 ml Breast surgery - Axillary lymphadenectomy 80 – 600 ml Plastic surgery - Breast reduction 150 – 250 ml Plastic surgery - Face lift (rhytidectomy) 50 – 150 ml Plastic surgery - Hand 50 – 150 ml Gynaecology - Ceasarean section 60 – 400 ml ORL surgery – Parotidectomy 40 – 300 ml ORL surgery - Laryngectomy 40 – 300 ml Urology 100 – 450 ml
  • Why do most surgeons like to suture or tape the wound drain to the patient?
    to prevent that the patient - by accident - pulls the drain out of the wound to ensure that the drain remains “put” into the patient
  • What is wound drainage?
    The post-operative evacuation or removal of air, fluid and devitalised tissues from the operating site after surgery.
  • What are the most important reasons for wound drainage?
    to drain the exudate or wound fluid to promote the wound flaps to join together to prevent infections
  • What other purposes are there for wound drainage?
    Promotion of a faster wound healing Reduction of haematoma Reduction of possible infections Reduction of scar tissue formation
  • What are the factors for providing wound drainage and why is it essential?
    Haematoma formation - haematomas produce elevation and discoloration of the wound edges, discomfort, and swelling. Patellar dislocation following haematoma - A large hematoma can cause a disruption of the medial retinaculum. This may cause patellar dislocation after primary total knee replacement. Neck haematoma - Neck hematomas following operations on the thyroid, parathyroid, or carotid artery are particularly dangerous, because they may expand rapidly and compromise the airway. Wound infection with small haematoma - Small hematomas may resorb, but they increase the incidence of wound infection. Fullness, pain, bruising and psychological fear of bleeding - Feeling of fullness and pain in the area which is affected. The skin may turn into deep purple blue colour and may have an effect on patients and their psychological fear of bleeding. Leaking - accumulated blood increase pressure and blood sometimes leaks through skin sutures. Compression and lack of oxygen- Proper oxygen or if the tissues in the affected area get compressed. Necrosis - Necrosis which occurs due to the death of the blood cells, wound separation and infection can also be observed. Seroma formation - Seromas often follow operations that involve elevation of skin flaps and transection of numerous lymphatic channels (eg, mastectomy, operations in the groin). Abscess: risk of infection - Seroma formation may develop into an abscess and begin the symptoms of an infection and requires medical treatment for that. Abscess: uncomfortable and cause of sickness - An abscess is unlikely to disappear on its own, it may grow in size and become very uncomfortable, and the associated infection may cause high level of sickness. Detect a bleeder early - When a drain is used, a large bleeder can be detected (if this occurs) early in the recovery room and measures can be taken immediately. Wound healing - Remove accumulative wound fluid, reduce internal pressure, draw wound clefts together, reduce scar tissue.
  • What are the applications for wound drainage and what is the expected volume to be collected post-operatively?
    following surgeries General surgery 50 – 400 ml Orthopedics - total knee replacement 600 – 800 ml Orthopedics - total hip replacement 300 – 600 ml Orthopedics - Spinal surgery 200 – 300 ml Abdominal - Hepatectomy 200 – 400 ml Abdominal - Pancreatectomy 200 – 400 ml Abdominal - Abdominoperineal resect. 200 – 400 ml Breast surgery - Mastectomy 80 – 600 ml Breast surgery - Axillary lymphadenectomy 80 – 600 ml Plastic surgery - Breast reduction 150 – 250 ml Plastic surgery - Face lift (rhytidectomy) 50 – 150 ml Plastic surgery - Hand 50 – 150 ml Gynaecology - Ceasarean section 60 – 400 ml ORL surgery – Parotidectomy 40 – 300 ml ORL surgery - Laryngectomy 40 – 300 ml Urology 100 – 450 ml
  • Why do most surgeons like to suture or tape the wound drain to the patient?
    to prevent that the patient - by accident - pulls the drain out of the wound to ensure that the drain remains “put” into the patient
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